Down The Up Staircase

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What I had initially thought was an ordinary photo of my wife walking down a wide stairway turned out to be a rather interesting example of an optical illusion. The high concrete wall on her right had been partially painted with a dark grey paint which gives the illusion that the stairs could be going up. Also worth mentioning is that the lighter grey in the upper right of the picture is not some distant foggy vista. It’s still the wall!

 

On Trying To See Clearly

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We went to the Boston Museum of Fine Arts today and I took a hell of a lot of photographs. In the end though, what came out of that trip is how terribly hard it is to really see anything clearly.

 

Going Through The Door

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The man who comes back through the Door in the Wall will never be quite the same as the man who went out. He will be wiser but less sure, happier but less self-satisfied, humbler in acknowledging his ignorance yet better equipped to understand the relationship of words to things, of systematic reasoning to the unfathomable mystery which it tries, forever vainly, to comprehend.
– Aldous Huxley

Looking vs Seeing

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Here’s the thing.

These people swarm over Boston all day every day. Objectively of course we are a great city to visit. Loaded with history, fine places to stay, major cultural institutions, great universities, not to mention our beloved sports teams and fine restaurants. Many many tourist buses prowl our neighborhoods with their windows wide open making it easy for passengers to peer at the passing sites. The drivers of these giant vehicles deliver a continuous river of information about what they are currently going by.

However, I wonder about how much these people are actually seeing. They’re looking yes. But seeing? I’m not so sure.

It’s the same problem with our photography isn’t it?

We look constantly but how much do we really see?

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