The “Peace” Rose

It is a Hybrid Tea Rose and many millions of plants have been sold since it burst onto the world stage in 1945. It was developed by the French rose breeder, Francis Meilland, between 1935 and 1939 who, when he saw that war with Germany was inevitable, sent cuttings to friends in Italy, Turkey, Germany and the USA. History tells that it was on the very last flight before the German invasion of France. In the USA, the rose breeders Conrad Pyle Co., successfully grew it and thereby kept it safe.

However, because the various recipients of these precious cuttings could not communicate with each other for the duration of the war, it was given several different names. France called it ‘Madame A. Meilland’ after Meilland’s mother. Italy called it ‘Goia’ (Joy). Germany named it ‘Glory Dei’ (glory to God) and the USA called it ‘Peace’.

The Dying Embers of a Rose

There’s as 16mm 1.4 lens that you can get for the Fuji X system that, in my opinion, is absolutely magic. Part of the lens’ beauty is that it can focus very closely. It’s not a macro for sure but you’d never believe how close it can get.

Take a hard look at this photo. The subject is a rather nondescript rose on its last legs. But when I shot it very closely and let Lightroom do some alchemy, the rose became another creature altogether.

By The Water

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I think what makes water lilies so beautiful, beside their sunburst shape, is the fact that they are surrounded, most of the time, by a frame of vibrant green lily pads. This singular beauty was blooming along the banks of the Charles River in a side canal about even with Clarendon Street. 30 yards away a stream of cars was rushing by, yet somehow the power of this single glorious blossom shutdown the din of the city and spread a meditative calm over all who came near it.

The Butterfly on Boylston Street

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I’m really happy with this photograph; not for the subject matter, although it certainly is nice. No, I’m happy with it because of where I took it. It was on the second block of Boylston Street in Boston in an area of high end shops and a ton of foot traffic. This little butterfly was sipping nectar from a flower less than a yard off the busy sidewalk. It just goes to show you that if you stand still long enough and pay very close attention to your immediate surrounds, mother nature will occasionally reward you with a lovely gift.

By the way while we’re on the subject of mother nature and her gifts, there are now turkeys grazing on Boston Common. How they got there we’ll never know. But what fun it was to see them.

Beauty And The Bug

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On a one day swing up and back to Maine yesterday, I took along my trusty Ricoh GR. The above is just one of a number of “keepers” I got on that trip. The little camera is a powerhouse for close up work having no anti-aliasing filter. Everytime I use it I like it more and more.