It’s Coming!

One holiday that’s celebrated with a vengeance here on Beacon Hill is Halloween. It’s a little early I know but some buildings are already cranking up their decorations as per this doorway.

If you’re ever in this area on the actual Halloween day, do yourself a favor and drop by. Bring a camera. You’ll not regret it.

Seaside Discussion

Not my usual Boston-centric street-photograph but rather a west coast shot of some friends talking beside the sea in Santa Barbara, California. The reason I’ve included it here is that it can serve as an example of how a photo can transition from one genre to another in post processing.

When this image started out, it was in color and exposed in a way that my friends’ features were clearly visible. By converting it to monochrome and making it a silhouette, the abstract nature of the composition is highlighted, made even more striking by the arch encircling them.

Hope you like it.

The Dying Embers of a Rose

There’s as 16mm 1.4 lens that you can get for the Fuji X system that, in my opinion, is absolutely magic. Part of the lens’ beauty is that it can focus very closely. It’s not a macro for sure but you’d never believe how close it can get.

Take a hard look at this photo. The subject is a rather nondescript rose on its last legs. But when I shot it very closely and let Lightroom do some alchemy, the rose became another creature altogether.

It’s Getting VERY Serious!

I certainly can’t claim that Boston is a bastion of conservatism but when I saw this truck it’s becoming increasingly clear that we’re in for a battle royal in the coming months.

Looking For Empathy

I was wandering around Harvard Square this morning, taking pictures of this and that when I came across this lady beggar sitting with all her worldly possessions almost in the middle of the sidewalk. Not only was she homeless but she clearly had mental problems as well. From this quick photo I took you can’t see what she’s doing, so I’ll tell you.

She’s putting a wrapped sandwich, a kind passerby just gave her, inside a big black plastic bag, one of many next to her on the sidewalk.

For a brief fleeting moment she found the empathy she was seeking and I stopped taking “this and that” photographs.